hand-foot-and-mouth disease 2

How do you get infected? Droplet infections: Many infections are caused by sneezing or coughing. contagious infection:Virus gets into mucous membranes such as the mouth and eyes and gets infected through the hand that touched the blister or touched the stool when changing diapers. It may also be infected by touching toys that have a virus attached. Even if the symptoms go away, the virus still gets excreted in the stool, which can be a source of infection for two to four weeks. Point of preventive measures of hand foot and mouth disease First of all, hand wash When hand-foot-and-mouth disease occurs in a childcare facility or kindergarten etc., group infections are likely to occur. There is no effective vaccine, so it’s important to have a habit of washing your hands well on a regular basis. Wash your hands thoroughly with running water and soap, and share a common towel. You can expect further effects by using alcohol hand antiseptic after hand washing. Moderate diaper changing After changing diapers, wash your hands thoroughly regardless of your child’s symptoms. It is possible that the virus may have been excreted in the stool for 2 to 4 weeks if symptoms have disappeared, […]

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Hand-foot-and-mouth disease 1

What is hand foot and mouth disease? Hand-foot-and-mouth disease is an acute viral infection that causes blisters in the hands, feet, and mouth, and is prevalent mainly in summer, especially in children under the age of five. It is designated as 5 class infectious disease by law about infectious disease. Pathogens are viruses derived from the human intestinal tract, and mainly include Coxsackie virus A6, A16, and Enterovirus 71. The types of epidemic vary from year to year. Features and main symptoms of the epidemic If you suffer from hand-foot-and-mouth disease, 2-3 days of blistering (blebbing-like swelling) will appear on the mucous membranes in the mouth, palms, soles and soles, etc. after a 3- to 5-day incubation period. About 30% of children have fever, but high fever is said to be less frequent. Usually, the marks of Minamata do not become scabs, but they will improve in 3 to 7 days. In rare cases, complications such as meningitis, cerebellar ataxia, encephalitis, etc. may be caused and aggravated.   Hand-foot-and-mouth disease caused by Coxsackie virus type A6 is characterized by large blisters, and it may appear in the thighs and buttocks. It is not uncommon for fever to exceed 39 ° […]

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